Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2017, Page: 7-11
Presence of Campylobacter spp. in Whole Chickens and Viscera Marketed in the Municipality Girardot Aragua State, Venezuela
Bracho-Espinoza Héctor, Veterinary Sciences Program, Animal Production Department, National Experimental University "Francisco de Miranda”, La Vela de Coro, Falcón, Venezuela
Lemus-Córdova Publio, Laboratory of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Central University of Venezuela, Maracay, Aragua, Venezuela
Justacara Iris, Laboratory of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Central University of Venezuela, Maracay, Aragua, Venezuela
Received: Oct. 16, 2016;       Accepted: Dec. 2, 2016;       Published: Jan. 10, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20170201.12      View  2133      Downloads  91
Abstract
Consumers of food products of animal origin, require compliance with good manufacturing practices, to ensure their safety. The presence of pathogens able to produce food (ETAs) transmitted diseases, justify the urgent need to determine the presence of Campylobacter spp. This research descriptive transversal, aimed at detecting the presence of Campylobacter spp in broilers packed whole and viscera, marketed in the municipality Girardot of the State Aragua, Venezuela, where they were collected through a non-probability sampling weekly four chickens of three production batches, during June 2013, a total of 48 chickens and 48 groups of viscera. They were assessed by rapid plate test; finding Campylobacter spp in lot 1 100% for broilers and viscera, in Lot 2 68.75% in one chickens and 50% in viscera and Lot 3 75% and 56.5% in chicken and viscera; averaging 81.25% for whole chickens and 68.50% for viscera. The number of colony forming units (CFU) than the infective dose for individual’s ≥500 CFU, was obtained in 43.75% of the chickens and viscera 25% lot 1, 12.5% of broilers and viscera lot 2 and 6.25% of chickens and viscera lot 3. In determining the degree of correlation between the UFC in chickens and viscera an association between these variables (P<0.005) was observed.
Keywords
Campylobacter spp, Whole Chickens, Offal, Prevalence, Safety
To cite this article
Bracho-Espinoza Héctor, Lemus-Córdova Publio, Justacara Iris, Presence of Campylobacter spp. in Whole Chickens and Viscera Marketed in the Municipality Girardot Aragua State, Venezuela, International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 7-11. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20170201.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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