Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2019, Page: 1-7
Evidence of African Swine Fever Virus in Pigs Slaughtered at Muhanzi Municipal Abattoir in Bukavu City, Eastern of Democratic Republic of Congo
Bisimwa Ntagereka Patrick, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Wasso Shukuru Dieudonné, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Ntakundi Muderhwa Théophile, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Bwihangane Birindwa Ahadi, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Bisimwa Basengere Espoir, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Mushagalusa Nachigera Gustave, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Katcho Karume, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Baluku Bajope, Department of Animal Science and Production, Université Evangélique en Afrique, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of Congo
Received: Dec. 14, 2018;       Accepted: Jan. 2, 2019;       Published: Feb. 19, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20190401.11      View  173      Downloads  60
Abstract
African swine fever (ASF) is an acute, highly infectious and fatal arboviral disease affecting both wild and domestic pigs causing a very high mortality rate that goes up to 100%. Up to date no vaccines are available to protect the animals against the disease. No study has been conducted to assess the presence of ASFV in imported slaughtered pigs in Bukavu city and very limited literature is available on ASF in the entire country of Democratic Republic of Congo. A cross sectional study was carried out in Muhanzi municipal abattoir of Bukavu city, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo to investigate the presence of antibodies against African swine fever virus (ASFV) and the viral genome in imported pigs for slaughtering. The commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent and the conventional polymerase chain reaction assays were used to screen both ASFV antibodies and viral genome respectively. In total 284 pigs were tested out of which 87.3% (248/284) were female adult of more than 1 year old. The majority of them (75.4% (214/284) were imported from Rwanda of which about 62.7% (178/284) of them presented clinical sign such as redness in the skin. Most of them (90.8%) were exotic breed. Out of 284 animals tested, ASFV antibodies were detected in 69 giving an overall seroprevalence of 24.2% from which pigs originated from Idjwi territory were more ASF seropositive (64.2%) compared to the one imported from Rwanda (11.2%). The seropositivity was found to be significantly associated with the breed (OR= 7.4, p<0.05), origin of animals (OR = 14.2, p<0.05) as well as all the observed clinical signs (p<0.05) except nasal discharges and abnormal liver (p>0.05). Additionally, 38 animals out of 284 tested (13.3%) were ASFV PCR positive with high infectivity rate (35.7%) when pigs slaughtered originated from Idjwi territory of the DRC were found to be more infected than the one imported from Rwanda (OR= 8.5, p<0.05). The ASFV PCR positivity was found to be significantly associated with age where young animals (<12 months old) were found to be more infected (OR= 3.6, p<0.05). Similarly, the local breeds were found to be significantly more infected when compared with exotic breed (OR-7.6; p<0.0001). Deliberate policy has to be implemented in order to prevent spread of the disease to pig farms within the region and for saving the pig industry from ASF devastation.
Keywords
Diagnosis, African Swine Fever, Slaughtered Pigs, Prevalence, Bukavu City
To cite this article
Bisimwa Ntagereka Patrick, Wasso Shukuru Dieudonné, Ntakundi Muderhwa Théophile, Bwihangane Birindwa Ahadi, Bisimwa Basengere Espoir, Mushagalusa Nachigera Gustave, Katcho Karume, Baluku Bajope, Evidence of African Swine Fever Virus in Pigs Slaughtered at Muhanzi Municipal Abattoir in Bukavu City, Eastern of Democratic Republic of Congo, International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20190401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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